Pay Transparency

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Do you know how much money your coworkers are making? Would you want to know?

Pay transparency has been a hot topic in the news recently, due to legislation requiring corporations to disclose pay rates for their employees broken down by gender and race. However, many are using online sites such as Glassdoor and Indeed to look up median salaries by company, position, and location.

A New York Times article from last week by Jena McGregor outlines the growing demand for pay transparency: “Shareholders have pushed technology and financial services companies to release their gender pay gap statistics. More state and local governments have passed pay equity laws, some of which require state contractors to report data or certify they pay men and women the same.” McGregor also interviewed an executive from Glassdoor, who relayed that millennials in particular don’t see discussing salaries as taboo.

Payscale.com defines pay transparency in a different way: “Being more transparent about pay doesn’t have to mean posting everyone’s salary for all to see, though there are some companies that go that far. What it does mean is employees having an understanding of their company’s compensation philosophy, strategies and practices.”

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What do you think? Should salaries be discussed openly in the workplace?

Push for pay transparency grows stronger

What is Pay Transparency and Why Does it Matter?

Parallel Careers- the rise of “Moonlighting”

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Have you ever had a second job in addition to your full-time gig? Or have you ever needed two or three jobs just to get by?

A recent article in The Japan Times discusses the increasing prevalence of the parallel career, pertaining to those “who hold multiple jobs or engage in various activities in addition to regular work.” In Japan, many millennials are choosing to reduce their hours at their regular job in order to pursue their passions and make extra money on the side. Some companies are even encouraging their workers to do so, claiming that it increases morale and productivity in the workplace.

The nature of work itself has changed over the years, in part due to the recession of the past decade. It is no longer a sure bet to work for the same company one’s whole life, and that company in turn would give their workers full benefits and a pension. Instead, workers are “moonlighting” and taking on multiple part-time jobs to fulfill their needs. Monty Mumford for Forbes writes: “The changes in those nine years have been profound. The notion of the freelancer as an outsider, as somebody who is not trusted enough or somehow too flaky to be employed full-time, is now the Average Joe, leveraging his or her time by mixing and matching any number of gigs to bring in dollars and a living income.”

What do you think? Would you rather work one full-time job, or multiple part-time jobs?

Parallel careers grow attractive for millennials, as lifetime employment loses luster

Moonlighting Takes The Gig Economy To The Next Freelancing Level

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