Vacation Time Unused in America

sea-beach-holiday-vacation.jpgHow many vacation days a year do you get at your place of work? Two weeks, none, or unlimited?

Today’s topic is paid leave in the Unites States – are American workers using their much-deserved time off? Research indicates that most Americans only take about two weeks off per year.

According to research from Project: Time Off, “By forfeiting vacation days, American workers gave up $66.4 billion in 2016 benefits alone. That means that last year employees effectively donated an average of $604 in work time to their employer.”

Why is this so important? The Project’s GfK survey data showed that: “Unused vacation days cost the U.S. economy $236 billion in 2016, due to lost spending. That spending would have supported 1.8 million American jobs and generated $70 billion in additional income for American workers. If the 54 percent of workers who left time unused in 2016 took just one more day off, it would drive $33 billion in economic impact.”

Not only does this have an economic effect on the country, it also takes a mental toll on the workers and their companies. Colleen Kane for Fortune writes: “when people don’t take time off to reset, their resulting stress and burnout can be detrimental to both workers and their employers.”

The benefits for employers for so-called “unlimited” vacation policies are illustrated in a recent article in the Wall Street Journal: “Employers say they like the policies because they can minimize staff burnout. It doesn’t hurt that they can save on costs, as the policies mean they no longer pay employees who leave the company for unused vacation days.” On the other hand, “unlimited vacation time isn’t a perfect solution to an overworked workforce. Employees can become more hesitant to take time off when they’re allowed to do it any time—and for as long as they desire.”

What do you think? Would you take unlimited vacation if it was offered? Or would you find it difficult to be away from the workplace?

Unlimited Vacation Time is a Lot of Work

Why Americans Just Won’t Take Time Off

The State of The American Vacation 2017

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Project: Time Off

Parallel Careers- the rise of “Moonlighting”

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Have you ever had a second job in addition to your full-time gig? Or have you ever needed two or three jobs just to get by?

A recent article in The Japan Times discusses the increasing prevalence of the parallel career, pertaining to those “who hold multiple jobs or engage in various activities in addition to regular work.” In Japan, many millennials are choosing to reduce their hours at their regular job in order to pursue their passions and make extra money on the side. Some companies are even encouraging their workers to do so, claiming that it increases morale and productivity in the workplace.

The nature of work itself has changed over the years, in part due to the recession of the past decade. It is no longer a sure bet to work for the same company one’s whole life, and that company in turn would give their workers full benefits and a pension. Instead, workers are “moonlighting” and taking on multiple part-time jobs to fulfill their needs. Monty Mumford for Forbes writes: “The changes in those nine years have been profound. The notion of the freelancer as an outsider, as somebody who is not trusted enough or somehow too flaky to be employed full-time, is now the Average Joe, leveraging his or her time by mixing and matching any number of gigs to bring in dollars and a living income.”

What do you think? Would you rather work one full-time job, or multiple part-time jobs?

Parallel careers grow attractive for millennials, as lifetime employment loses luster

Moonlighting Takes The Gig Economy To The Next Freelancing Level

Benefits of a Positive Workplace Culture

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We did it! The weekend is here!

Have you ever wished that your place of work had a more positive atmosphere? Well, research shows that a more positive work environment can help improve employee’s health and productivity, as well as the company’s bottom line.

Michelle Burke, in her piece for the Huffington Post, writes about the effect that spreading kindness can have at work: “when leadership is focused on building a kinder, encouraging and engaged environment, it increases positive emotions and better health. People’s relationships improve fostering more collaboration and team spirit. In turn, this safeguards against stressful situations and negative experiences. It also helps to improve employee resiliency to deal with challenges while boosting their well-being. When organizations develop positive, kind cultures they achieve significantly higher levels of organizational effectiveness.”

What will you do next week at work to help promote a positive atmosphere?

Creating a Positive Workplace Culture- A Little Goes a Long Way

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