Pay Transparency

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Do you know how much money your coworkers are making? Would you want to know?

Pay transparency has been a hot topic in the news recently, due to legislation requiring corporations to disclose pay rates for their employees broken down by gender and race. However, many are using online sites such as Glassdoor and Indeed to look up median salaries by company, position, and location.

A New York Times article from last week by Jena McGregor outlines the growing demand for pay transparency: “Shareholders have pushed technology and financial services companies to release their gender pay gap statistics. More state and local governments have passed pay equity laws, some of which require state contractors to report data or certify they pay men and women the same.” McGregor also interviewed an executive from Glassdoor, who relayed that millennials in particular don’t see discussing salaries as taboo.

Payscale.com defines pay transparency in a different way: “Being more transparent about pay doesn’t have to mean posting everyone’s salary for all to see, though there are some companies that go that far. What it does mean is employees having an understanding of their company’s compensation philosophy, strategies and practices.”

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What do you think? Should salaries be discussed openly in the workplace?

Push for pay transparency grows stronger

What is Pay Transparency and Why Does it Matter?

Benefits of a Positive Workplace Culture

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We did it! The weekend is here!

Have you ever wished that your place of work had a more positive atmosphere? Well, research shows that a more positive work environment can help improve employee’s health and productivity, as well as the company’s bottom line.

Michelle Burke, in her piece for the Huffington Post, writes about the effect that spreading kindness can have at work: “when leadership is focused on building a kinder, encouraging and engaged environment, it increases positive emotions and better health. People’s relationships improve fostering more collaboration and team spirit. In turn, this safeguards against stressful situations and negative experiences. It also helps to improve employee resiliency to deal with challenges while boosting their well-being. When organizations develop positive, kind cultures they achieve significantly higher levels of organizational effectiveness.”

What will you do next week at work to help promote a positive atmosphere?

Creating a Positive Workplace Culture- A Little Goes a Long Way

Occupational Burnout

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What is burnout? It’s not just the result of working long hours on the job. Burnout can result from not feeling valued at work, lacking social support, and feeling out of control of your job situation.

Paula Davis-Laack for Psychology Today defines burnout as: “the chronic state of being out of sync with one or more aspects of your life, and the result is a loss of energy, enthusiasm, and confidence.” She outlines the six sources of occupational burnout as: lack of control, values conflict, insufficient reward, work overload, unfairness, and breakdown of community.

Problems at work can overlap into problems in your home life. Kenneth R. Rosen of The New York Times writes: “These stressors can manifest in outbursts against co-workers, violence or anger toward loved ones at home, loss of appetite and passion for things once loved, or being unable to find motivation for things that you were able to accomplish with ease.”

Have you experienced burnout at work before? Do you think this problem can be solved, or will it continue to get worse?

Leave your thoughts in the comments below!

How to Recognize Burnout Before You’re Burned Out

Six Sources of Burnout at Work

 

How many hours a week do you think is too much? What are you willing to give up in your personal life in order to achieve your career goals?

In Silicon Valley, the culture encourages tech workers to work as many hours as they can in order to help their company succeed. This problem is especially rampant with startups, where their livelihood hinges on garnering funding from investors.

This recent New York Times article linked here describes the phenomenon and the potential ramifications with overloading workers in the company’s quest to succeed.

Becoming a tech billionaire is a dream for many, but not all can do what it takes to achieve it.

“In Silicon Valley, Working 9 to 5 is for Losers”

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Tirza van Dijk

Welcome!

Hello!

Welcome to The Break Room Chronicles! This blog is here to provide information on all things work-related. All are welcome here: whether you are a student, a full-time employee, or a remote worker, this is your resource for finding happiness and work-life balance. rayi-christian-wicaksono-366

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